lens

Zeiss Milvus 25 mm

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The Zeiss Milvus 25 mm f/1.4 lens is the company’s latest full-frame single-lens reflex camera lens. The lens, which was developed for the DSLR systems from Canon and Nikon, is claimed to be suitable primarily for landscape and architecture photography, and for journalistic shots and videos.

The completely new optical design is said to ensure superior performance across the entire image field, delivering high-contrast photos and a harmonious bokeh.

The company claims even at full aperture there are hardly any colour fringes.

The metal housing makes the lens robust, and it offers dirt and dust protection. The 172-degree focus rotation angle is said to enable precise manual focusing.

The lens is not just for photography, with the company saying the lens is suitable primarily for interviews and documentaries where the videographer can utilize natural light. Thanks to the de-click function in the version for the Nikon mount the aperture can be adjusted continuously.

The Zeiss Milvus 25 mm f/1.4 will be available in November.

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Leica 90 mm Thambar-M

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Quick, which one is the new lens? It’s the one on the right.

What’s that line: everything new is old again? Leica has reached back into its classic lens bin and come up with the Thambar-M 90 mm f/2.2, the modern version of a 1935 soft-focus lens, designed for portraiture. The optical design of its ancestor remains almost unchanged. The only difference is that the four elements in three groups that make up the design have now been single-coated to protect the glass against environmental influences and surface corrosion. The 20 blades of its iris deliver a unique bokeh with perfectly round rendition of point light sources.

The soft look of the Thambar is the result of intentionally accepted under-correction of spherical aberration. This under-correction increases towards the edges of the optical system with the consequence that not only the depth of focus, but also the degree of softening can be precisely controlled by means of the stepless aperture setting. The effect is more pronounced as apertures increase, and is continually reduced as the lens is stopped down to smaller apertures.

The design of the original lens has been almost completely preserved. The black paint finish, the proportions of the lens and its aperture engravings in red and white correspond to the appearance of the original. In addition to this, slight modifications have been made that bring the lens into line with the current, minimalist design of modern M-series lenses. These include the knurling, the lettering and scales and the specific use of sharp edges and bevelling.

The Leica Thambar-M 90 mm f/2.2 will be on sale from mid-November.

Fujinon XF 80 mm

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New from Fujifilm is the XF 80 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro lens, the first 1.0x magnification mid-telephoto macro lens in the X Series lineup. The lens features a focal length equivalent to 122 mm (in the 35 mm format).

The lens features an optical construction of 16 elements in 12 groups, including one aspherical lens, one Super ED lens and three ED lenses.

The lens has enhanced AF capabilities utilizing a Floating Focus System that suppresses aberration. The lens also supports handheld shooting with Optical Image Stabilization. A fluorine coating has been applied to the front lens element, making it less susceptible to smudges, water and dirt.

The lens is also designed to be weather and dust resistant, and operates in temperatures as low as 14°F/-10°C.

The Fujinon XF 80 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR lens will be available in November.

Fujinon GF 45 mm WR lens

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Fujifilm has unveiled the Fujinon GF 45 mm f/2.8 R WR for the GFX 50S medium format mirrorless digital camera system. The new lens has a focal length equivalent to 36 mm (in the 35 mm format).

The company says that, as with all GF lenses, the 45 mm lens is a professional quality lens capable of reproducing rich tones and unique colours.

With a construction of 8 groups and 11 elements using one aspherical lens and two ED lenses, the new lens is said to provide the highest image quality while reducing aberrations. The lens features Nano GI coating to suppress ghosting and flare, and is weather and dust resistant capable of operating in environments as cold as 14°F/-10°C.

The Fujinon GF 45 mm f/2.8 R WR lens will be available in November.

Canon 85 mm lens

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The Canon EF 85 mm f/1.4L IS USM lens is an addition to the company’s existing 85 mm focal-range lens line-up. It is the first Canon EF 85 mm lens to feature image stabilization, providing up to four stops of shake correction.

The lens utilizes one large diameter, high-precision molded glass aspherical lens and features an ASC coating. The lens has a circular aperture with 9-blade iris.

The Canon EF 85 mm f/1.4 L IS USM is scheduled to be available November.

Three Canon tilt-shift lenses

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Canon has announced a trio of tilt-shift lenses: the TS-E 50 mm f/2.8L Macro lens, TS-E 90 mm f/2.8L Macro lens and TS-E 135 mm f/4L Macro lens.

Tilt-Shift lenses offer enhanced creative control over perspective through the tilt function and depth-of-field through the shift function in their images.

Enhanced optical elements like molded aspherical glass and UD lenses are at the core of the new lenses, providing edge-to-edge resolution, improved image quality over previous Canon TS-E lenses and minimum distortion, says the company. Canon also included two anti-reflective coatings, SubWaveLength Structure Coating (SWC) in the T50 mm and 135 mm lenses. and Air-Sphere Coating (ASC) in the 50 mm and 90 mm lenses. SWC helps reduce flare and ghosting, while ASC is a new technology that is said to provide amazingly high, anti-reflective performance, particularly when alleviating incidental light that can enter a lens.

The new tilt-shift lenses also offer improved operability over previous models, including larger tilt, shift-and-lock knobs, lock-release button and a new tilt-locking mechanism that firmly locks the lens in the zero-tilt position to help prevent unintended tilting. The rotation of the tilt-shift lenses also allows users to freely change the axis of tilt movement and shift from right angles to parallel to better adapt to various shooting conditions and situations.

The Canon TS-E 50 mm f/2.8L Macro lens, TS-E 90 mm f/2.8L Macro lens and TS-E 135 mm f/4L Macro lenses are scheduled to be available November.

Nikon 70-300 mm lens

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Nikon has upgraded its 70-300 mm full-frame lens with the AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR. The new lens offers enhanced Vibration Reduction (VR) image stabilization capability and integrates a stepping motor for fast and quiet AF performance, making it Nikon’s first full-frame AF-P lens.

Interestingly, the new version of the lens is lighter than its predecessor.

The new lens provides up to 4.5 stops of VR stabilization, for sharper photos and smoother video. Users can choose from either Normal or Sport VR Modes.

The stepping motor is said to deliver fast and quiet autofocus, reducing the sound of lens operation while recording HD or 4K UHD video. This new technology also contributes to the lens’ reduced weight.

The Electronic Diaphragm not only provides smooth exposure transitions during video capture, but also helps maintain consistent exposure during high-speed shooting, such as when photographing sports.

The lens features a minimum focus distance of 3.94 ft. (1.2 m) and a reproduction ratio of 0.25x.

The lens also features dust and drip resistance, along with a metal lens mount for durability. It features a 9-blade diaphragm for a natural, circular bokeh. The lens also features an ED element to significantly reduce instances of chromatic aberration.

UPDATE: The AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR will have a suggested retail price (MSRP) of $1,029.95; Canadian availability is to be announced.

Tamron 24-70 mm lens

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A 24-70 mm lens offers probably one of the most versatile zoom ranges, a put-it-on-the-camera-and-leave-it range. So here comes Tamron with its new SP 24-70 mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2 lens for full-frame DSLR cameras. The constant f/2.8 aperture makes it even more interesting.

The lens features Dual MPU (Micro Processing Units) to provide rapid autofocusing with improved accuracy and the highest vibration compensation performance of any lens in its class, says the company (CIPA level of 5 stops).

The use of specialized, high quality glass materials (offering greater optical transmittance) for the lens element are said to assure superior colour reproduction and greater sharpness, while the application of Tamron’s nanotechnology-based eBAND Coating substantially curbs the ghosting and flare that are prone to occur in backlit photography, successfully improving the overall optical performance of the lens, Tamron notes. Additionally, the lens provides the added conveniences of protective fluorine coating, moisture-resistant construction and a locking lens hood.

The lens’ optical construction consists of 17 elements in 12 groups using two XR (Extra Refractive Index) elements, three LD (Low Dispersion) elements, three GM (Glass-Molded aspherical), and one hybrid aspherical lens element. Together they are claimed to minimize axial chromatic aberrations, transverse chromatic aberrations, spherical aberrations and distortion, and allow a compact design that achieves superior image quality.

The lens is equipped with Tamron’s VC (Vibration Compensation) system. Adding an MPU dedicated to VC processing unleashes a new-generation algorithm, says Tamron, ensuring the highest vibration compensation ability in the class.
An electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now employed in Nikon-mount lenses.

The Tamron SP 24-70 mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2 lens will be available in Canon and Nikon mounts. Nikon mount will be available in August, the Canon mount in September.

Tamron 18-400 mm lens

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That’s no typo. Tamron has announced the 18-400 mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (28-620 mm full frame equivalent) for APS-C DSLR cameras.

The company says the lens includes “the most advanced optical and mechanical designs,” an HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) for the AF system, and Vibration Compensation system.

A new lens barrel design utilizing three-step extensions was developed to enable the necessary elongation to produce a 22.2x zoom ratio. Compared to the conventional approach, the division into a larger number of cams ensures comfortable operation and stability while zooming, Tamron advises.

The power-saving HLD motor produces “outstanding” driving torque, and adjusts motor rotation from low to high speed to enable accurate and quiet focusing. The HLD motor takes up less space thanks to its small size and circular arc shape that allows the size of the lens to be reduced.

The electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now employed in Nikon-mount lenses. More precise diaphragm and aperture control is possible because the diaphragm blades are driven and controlled by a motor through electronic pulse signals.
The lens also features moisture-resistant construction, and the Zoom Lock mechanism prevents undesired movement of the lens barrel under its own weight when the camera is angled downward while walking.

The device is compatible with the TAP-in Console, an optional accessory product. This provides a USB connection to a personal computer, enabling the user to easily update the lens’s firmware as well as to customize features, including fine adjustments to the AF and VC.

The lens is 123.9 mm / 121.4 mm long (Canon/Nikon) and weighs 710 g / 705 g (Canon/Nikon).

Tamron says its 18-400 mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD lens in Canon and Nikon mounts will be available in late July.

Zeiss Milvus 35 mm lens

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Zeiss has unveiled a new lens for full-frame DSLR cameras from Canon and Nikon: the Milvus 35 mm f/1.4. The company suggests the lens is “particularly suitable” for portrait photography, but also notes it is “perfectly at home” when used for landscape photography.

The manual focus lens is protected against dust and splashes and features a metal barrel.

With aspherical lens elements, special glass materials and advanced correction, Zeiss says it has given the lens a completely new optical design, delivering photos which are practically free from chromatic aberrations.

The lens, adds the company, is also suitable for film productions: the manual focus with a large rotation angle can be operated with the aid of a Zeiss Lens Gear with a follow-focus system. The de-click function allows the aperture to be set continuously in the version for Nikon cameras. Zeiss also has matched the colour characteristics of the ten Milvus lenses. Filmmakers can therefore switch between the focal lengths and still have a uniform colour look.

The Zeiss Milvus 35 f/1.4 lens will be available in July. No Canadian price has been announced as yet, but its recommended retail price in Europe is 1,999 euros.